Gamification – Part II

Gamification – Part II

Companies that use CRM can fall into the trap of logging new leads and contact but not ensuring new leads are actually sold to. Gamifying the entire sales process can make sure that your people are using the CRM to get the best results for your business, instead of just treating it a large database and repository. It can turn CRM into a process-oriented system and support continued business development, management oversight, and focus on the behaviours they want to drive (new lead generation and follow up, faster product development, shorter sales cycles, more client meetings).

To optimize gamification, the following aspects to gamification should be considered and implemented:
  • Instant and frequent feedback.
  • Simple rules – People pay attention to game rules. Game rules let them know what’s important. These become learning and training opportunities.
  • Challenging and achievable tasks.
  • Rules to encourage all the steps needed to manage all of the touch-points on the customer life cycle and drive employee and awareness of the processes.
  • Rewards which drive staff engagement – This can be anything from point earning, a progress bar, achievement badges, or even virtual currency with the end goal to improve return on investments, data quality, timelines, and learning.

As competition within the business environment gets tougher, companies revisit their CRM strategies to encourage sales staff to be more devoted to customers. Yet, the average disengagement rate of sales agents is 67%, which illustrates that companies should first reconsider how they speak to their sales reps and only then expect more customer-centric behaviour from them.

Gamification can take into account the goals and objectives of various aspects of a business. While it is obvious that this can be sales focused on revenue or number of sales, other focuses can be used to drive behaviour other than sales. For instance, a customer service department can gamify Net Promoter Scores, or the response and/or resolution times of a helpdesk and a marketing department can gamify New Contacts and Leads generated. The other thing we encourage is gamifying use of the CRM in general to drive user adoption and train the users to use CRM properly.

Instead of encouraging your sales force to be super competitive with one another a game rule that encourages help and cooperation to close a sale. People can be rewarded for their contributions to others’ success, for their assistance, information and examples loaded on corporate knowledge management systems and activity on corporate social networks. Gamification lets you set weekly matches between teams, individuals and departments. These events are fun and make your people strive to do their best every week.

When customers have problems that require them to contact customer service or support, they expect good service. That’s difficult for employees, as these are the staff who are often most disengaged from their jobs. These departments often have high employee turnover. Having these people focus on resolutions all day quickly get repetitive and boring. That prompts many agents to seek employment in other fields, but it also affects those who stick it out in their current jobs. When support people are bored or unmotivated, they start making little errors, like typos or sounding irritable, and sound lifeless to customers. Gameification can change this. The rules of the game can take into account and reward reps who take the most calls, have the most talk time, and/or have the highest connect rate.

When customers have problems that require them to contact customer service or support, they expect good service. That’s difficult for employees, as these are the staff who are often most disengaged from their jobs. These departments often have high employee turnover. Having these people focus on resolutions all day quickly get repetitive and boring. That prompts many agents to seek employment in other fields, but it also affects those who stick it out in their current jobs. When support people are bored or unmotivated, they start making little errors, like typos or sounding irritable, and sound lifeless to customers. Gamification can change this. The rules of the game can take into account and reward reps who take the most calls, have the most talk time, and/or have the highest connect rate.

To optimize gamification, the following aspects to gamification should be considered and implemented:

  • Instant and frequent feedback.
  • Simple rules – People pay attention to game rules. Game rules let them know what’s important. These become learning and training opportunities.
  • Challenging and achievable tasks.
  • Rules to encourage all the steps needed to manage all of the touchpoints on the customer life cycle and drive employee and awareness of the processes.
  • Rewards which drive staff engagement – This can be anything from point earning, a progress bar, achievement badges, or even virtual currency with the end goal to improve return on investments, data quality, timelines, and learning.

As competition within the business environment gets tougher, companies revisit their CRM strategies to encourage sales staff to be more devoted to customers. Yet, the average disengagement rate of sales agents is 67%, which illustrates that companies should first reconsider how they speak to their sales reps and only then expect more customer-centric behaviour from them.

Gamification can take into account the goals and objectives of various aspects of a business. While it is obvious that this can be sales focused on revenue or number of sales, other focuses can be used to drive behaviour other than sales. For instance, a customer service department can gamify Net Promoter Scores, or the response and/or resolution times of a helpdesk and a marketing department can gamify New Contacts and Leads generated. The other thing we encourage is gamifying use of the CRM in general to drive user adoption and train the users to use CRM properly.

Instead of encouraging your sales force to be super competitive with one another a game rule that encourages help and cooperation to close a sale. People can be rewarded for their contributions to others’ success, for their assistance, information and examples loaded on corporate knowledge management systems and activity on corporate social networks. Gamification lets you set weekly matches between teams, individuals and departments. These events are fun and make your people strive to do their best every week.

When customers have problems that require them to contact customer service or support, they expect good service. That’s difficult for employees, as these are the staff who are often most disengaged from their jobs. These departments often have high employee turnover. Having these people focus on resolutions all day quickly get repetitive and boring. That prompts many agents to seek employment in other fields, but it also affects those who stick it out in their current jobs. When support people are bored or unmotivated, they start making little errors, like typos or sounding irritable, and sound lifeless to customers. Gamification can change this. The rules of the game can take into account and reward reps who take the most calls, have the most talk time, and/or have the highest connect rate.

When customers have problems that require them to contact customer service or support, they expect good service. That’s difficult for employees, as these are the staff who are often most disengaged from their jobs. These departments often have high employee turnover. Having these people focus on resolutions all day quickly get repetitive and boring. That prompts many agents to seek employment in other fields, but it also affects those who stick it out in their current jobs. When support people are bored or unmotivated, they start making little errors, like typos or sounding irritable, and sound lifeless to customers. Gamification can change this. The rules of the game can take into account and reward reps who take the most calls, have the most talk time, and/or have the highest connect rate.

Potential Issues with Gamification

One of the primary issues with gamification is overestimating game scores. Every game can be gamed. Rules that are focused on quantitative results can make sales people intentionally choose simpler deals or compete for bigger leads to raise the score. This can lead to people ignoring less lucrative leads or harder to service customers. Underestimation of valuable CRM activities can stimulate sales agents to skip them because of a high opportunity cost versus game reward. Ensuring fair and balanced game rules will help to avoid this. Gamification should motivate middle members to look up to high performers. Constant losing can be demotivating and prompts a weak performer to quit the game altogether. To combat this, a company can consider having people compete against their own past scores and results, or individually set goals. Also, to increase CRM adoption, a company should make sure the CRM game rules are fair. They can use more of relative and less of absolute indicators.

At BluRoot Inc., we are experts at designing and implementing the Zoho CRM system, making it work for your business, and ensuring the transition to CRM as easy and painless as possible for your team. We can import your existing customer and contact data, build the CRM system to assist your business’s unique sales process, and train your people to ensure everyone is properly using the software (though it is very intuitive!). Let us become your partner on your businesses path to growth and success!

2018-12-02T15:42:09+00:00